Tag Archives: Food

Street Food: Everything You Need to Know About Open-Air Stands, Carts, and Food Trucks Across the Globe

Street FoodStreet Food: Everything You Need to Know About Open-Air Stands, Carts, and Food Trucks Across the Globe

by Colleen Taylor Sen (Editor), Bruce Kraig (Editor)

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This redesigned, repackaged, and updated edition of Street Food surveys common street foods from more than 75 countries and regions across the globe.

An estimated 2.6 billion people worldwide eat street food every day. Once associated with developing countries, street food has spread around the globe, particularly in the United States, where a variety of food trucks, top chefs, and trendy pop-up restaurants specialize in grab-and-go fare. Now more than ever, readers are interested in finding and tasting the different street foods prepared and consumed around the world.

Globe-trotters in search of the street-food experience will find information about street-food superpowers—such as China, India, and Mexico—and countries where street food plays a less important role, such as those in northern Europe. Contributed by the world’s leading food historians, the book’s entries provide a detailed look at vendor culture, fun facts, and illuminating statistics, as well as some historical and environmental background on specific foods.

First published in 2013, this reconceived version of Street Food is a comprehensive look at the world’s best street food, a must-have for travelers and foodies alike.

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Local Eats Paris: A Traveler’s Guide by Natasha McGuinness, Anne Bentley (Illustrator)

Local Eats ParisLocal Eats Paris: A Traveler’s Guide

by Natasha McGuinness, Anne Bentley (Illustrator)

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Local Eats Paris is the perfect traveling companion for those exploring the City of Lights and those simply delighted by all things French. The fabulous food found in the patisseries, bistros, fromageries, marches, cafes and more are described in delectable detail and accompanied by charming illustrations. A handy guide to ordering, a description of favorite French cheeses, perfect picnic food pairings, and a what’s what of market food can all be found in this lovely guide to Parisian gastronomy. The small format makes it the perfect guidebook to tuck into purse or backpack.

After writing Local Eats London: Bangers & Mash, Pasties, Jaffa Cake and other London Favorites, Natasha McGuinness hopped on a train and travelled through the Chunnel to turn her attention to Paris. After submersing herself in the gastronomy found in patisseries, boulangeries, bistros, marchés, fromageries and everything in between, she put together the perfect foodie dictionary to the cuisine found in the City of Lights. Now back in the United States, she lives in Los Angeles where she is working on her masters degree at the University of Southern California while plotting her next trip overseas.

Anne Bentley is an artist and illustrator based in Northern California. She creates wall art, hand-made cards, logo design, store signage and illustrations for boxed notecard sets, all while juggling paintbrushes, kids and dogs. The two dishes she always seeks out first when visiting Paris are duck confit and the perfect falafel found in her favorite neighborhood, Le Marais.

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Roadfood, 10th Edition: An Eater’s Guide to More Than 1,000 of the Best Local Hot Spots and Hidden Gems Across America

Roadfood 10th edRoadfood, 10th Edition: An Eater’s Guide to More Than 1,000 of the Best Local Hot Spots and Hidden Gems Across America 

by Jane Stern, Michael Stern

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First published in 1977, the original Roadfood became an instant classic. James Beard said, -This is a book that you should carry with you, no matter where you are going in these United States. It’s a treasure house of information.-
The 40th anniversary edition of Roadfood includes 1,000 of America’s best local eateries along highways and back roads, with nearly 200 new listings, as well as a brand new design.
Filled with enticing alternatives for chain-weary-travelers, Roadfood provides descriptions of and directions to (complete with regional maps) the best lobster shacks on the East Coast; the ultimate barbecue joints down South; the most indulgent steak houses in the Midwest; and dozens of top-notch diners, hotdog stands, ice-cream parlors, and uniquely regional finds in between. Each entry delves into the folkways of a restaurant’s locale as well as the dining experience itself, and each is written in the Sterns’ entertaining and colorful style. A cornucopia for road warriors and armchair epicures alike, Roadfood is a road map to some of the tastiest treasures in the United States.

America’s leading authorities on the culinary delights to be found while driving— Newsweek

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The World Atlas of Tea: From the Leaf to the Cup, the World’s Teas Explored and Enjoyed

world-atlas-of-tea The World Atlas of Tea: From the Leaf to the Cup, the World’s Teas Explored and Enjoyed by Kisi Smith

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The United States is the fourth largest global consumer of tea, with Canada following right behind. Black tea is the most popular but green tea sales are growing rapidly — more than 60 percent in ten years — driven by its proven health benefits. Specialty tea outlets are expected to double to nearly 8,000 by 2018 and an additional 40,000 coffee retailers are expected to generate more than 30 percent of their beverage sales from tea.

The World Atlas of Tea covers tea from the ground up, including why the soil in China makes different tea than the soil in India. Tea mixologist Krisi Smith explains what a tea drinker needs to know to appreciate teas of all descriptions. She follows tea from the plantation to harvesting and processing to how to make the perfect cup. The book is illustrated throughout with beautiful color photographs taken in the field.

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A Thousand Days in Tuscany: A Bittersweet Adventure

A Thousand Days in TuscanyA Thousand Days in Tuscany: A Bittersweet Adventure by Marlena De Blasi

They had met and married on perilously short acquaintance, she an American chef and food writer, he a Venetian banker. Now they were taking another audacious leap, unstitching their ties with exquisite Venice to live in a roughly renovated stable in Tuscany.
Once again, it was love at first sight. Love for the timeless countryside and the ancient village of San Casciano dei Bagni, for the local vintage and the magnificent cooking, for the Tuscan sky and the friendly church bells. Love especially for old Barlozzo, the village mago, who escorts the newcomers to Tuscany’s seasonal festivals; gives them roasted country bread drizzled with just-pressed olive oil; invites them to gather chestnuts, harvest grapes, hunt truffles; and teaches them to caress the simple pleasures of each precious day. It’s Barlozzo who guides them across the minefields of village history and into the warm and fiercely beating heart of love itself.
A Thousand Days in Tuscany is set in one of the most beautiful places on earth-and tucked into its fragrant corners are luscious recipes (including one for the only true bruschetta) directly from the author’s private collection.

Recipe from the book:

Deep-Fried Flowers, Vegetables, and Herbs
1 1/2 cups all purpose flour
2 cups beer
1/2 cup cold water
2 teaspoons fine sea salt
3 ice cubes
Peanut oil or extra virgin olive oil for frying
Zucchini blossoms, nasturtium flowers, and borage flowers, rinsed, dried, and stems trimmed
Celeryleaves cut in branches, rinsed, and dried Whole sage leaves, rinsed and dried
Tiny spring onions or scallions, stems trimmed to about 4 inches in length, rinsed and dried
Warm sea-salted water in a sprayer
In a large bowl, beat together with a fork the flour, beer, water, and sea salt to form a thin batter. Let the batter rest for an hour or so, covered and at room temperature. Stir in the ice cubes and let the batter rest for an additional half-hour. Stir the batter again. It should now be smooth and have the texture of heavy cream. If it’s too thick, add cold water by the tablespoonful until the “heavy cream” texture is achieved.
Over a medium flame, heat the oil in a deep fryer or a heavy pan to a depth of 3.” The more slowly the oil heats, the more evenly it will heat, helping you to avoid hot and cold spots and unevenly fried foods. Test the oil by dropping in a cube of bread. If it sizzles and turns golden in a few seconds, the oil is ready.
Drag the flowers, herbs, and spring onions through the batter, shaking off the excess. Place them into the hot oil and let them bob about for half a minute or so, allowing them to take on a good, dark crust. Turn them with tongs, to finish frying, then remove them with a slotted spoon to absorbent paper towels. Using a virgin plant sprayer, spray each batch immediately with warm sea-salted water and keep them in a 100-degree oven while you fry the next batch. Better, gather people around the stove and eat the things pan to hand to mouth. A very informal first course.

“De Blasi’s glittering descriptions and mouthwatering recipes take you directly into the heart of Italy and into the souls of the Italian people.”
-Adriana Trigiani, New York Times bestselling author of Lucia, Lucia

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A Kitchen in France: A Year of Cooking in My Farmhouse

A Kirchen in FranceA Kitchen in France: A Year of Cooking in My Farmhouse by Mimi Thorisson

With beguiling recipes and sumptuous photography, “A Kitchen in France” transports readers to the French countryside and marks the debut of a captivating new voice in cooking.
When Mimi Thorisson and her family moved from Paris to a small town in out-of-the-way Medoc, she did not quite know what was in store for them. She found wonderful ingredients–from local farmers and the neighboring woods–and, most important, time to cook. Her cookbook chronicles the family’s seasonal meals and life in an old farmhouse, all photographed by her husband, Oddur. Mimi’s convivial recipes–such as Roast Chicken with Herbs and Creme FraIche, Cepe and Parsley Tartlets, Winter Vegetable Cocotte, Apple Tart with Orange Flower Water, and Salted Butter Creme Caramel–will bring the warmth of rural France into your home.

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In Search of the Perfect Loaf: A Home Baker’s Odyssey

In Search of the perfect LoafIn Search of the Perfect Loaf: A Home Baker’s Odyssey by Samuel Fromartz

An irresistible account of bread, bread baking, and one home baker s journey to master his craft
In 2009, journalist Samuel Fromartz was offered the assignment of a lifetime: to travel to France to work in a boulangerie. So began his quest to hone not just his homemade baguette which later beat out professional bakeries to win the Best Baguette of D.C. but his knowledge of bread, from seed to table.
For the next four years, Fromartz traveled across the United States and Europe, perfecting his sourdough in California, his whole grain rye in Berlin, and his country wheat in the South of France. Along the way, he met historians, millers, farmers, wheat geneticists, sourdough biochemists, and everyone in between, learning about the history of breadmaking, the science of fermentation, and more. The result is an informative yet personal account of bread and breadbaking, complete with detailed recipes, tips, and beautiful photographs.
Entertaining and inspiring, this book will be a touchstone for a new generation of bakers and a must-read for anyone who wants to take a deeper look at this deceptively ordinary, exceptionally delicious staple: handmade bread.”

Terrific .Fromartz is much more than an obsessive cook. He s also a fine reporter and writer. And “Perfect Loaf” is much more than a book about baking bread .What Fromartz is really writing about is how a deeper understanding of something leads to a deeper appreciation of it.
He is showing us the world through a slice of bread.
“Los Angeles Times”

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Adventures In Vietnam — Street Food, Love And Taking Chances with Graham Holliday

Graham HollidayGraham Holliday grew up in Rugby, England, and moved to Iksan, South Korea, in 1996 to teach English. He relocated to Việt Nam the following year. He started work as a journalist in Sài Gòn in 2001. He is the author of the blog noodlepie, about street food in Sài Gòn. He has written for the Guardian (UK), the New York Times Magazine, the South China Morning Post, Time, BBC, CNN, and many other media outlets. He went on to become a foreign correspondent for Reuters news agency in Rwanda, and now works as a journalism trainer for the BBC and other organizations. He is currently based in Dakar, Senegal, and is writing a novel.

NPR Logo Listen to NPR’s the Salt as Rachal Martin interviews Graham Holliday.

NPR Graham Holliday Interview